The company list below is based on an analysis of over 50,000 companies in FlexJobs’ database and looks specifically at the part-time job posting histories that offered the highest number of either full or partial telecommute options. These part-time, remote jobs, which require less than 40 hours per week, were posted from July 1 through October 1, 2018.

Many online job platforms such as Upwork.com also have their own system for recognizing and removing job scams. According to the site, many of them involve “employers” who try to pay workers outside the site’s payment system, and engage in some sort of check or money order fraud. For more tips on avoiding job scams on freelancing sites, read about it here.


I came a low income single mother home. I earned two bachelors degrees, but had no car and no job to afford one. That killed my chances of working in either desired field after college. I worked part time for twelve years locally at a company, then was downsized. Mom died and I had to get an apartment. Still not enough money to risk getting a car when it could take from a month’s rent or more… that much closer to being out on the street with my belongings gone. I am really hopeful I can find something legitimate.

“As we saw in the latter part of 2018, we expect 2019 to continue to be a job seeker's market where companies will need to offer flexible/remote benefits to remain competitive and attract and retain the best talent,” said Sara Sutton, founder and CEO of FlexJobs. “As this list demonstrates, companies of all sizes and across all industries can adopt work-from-home and flexible work policies to meet the changing demands of the workforce,” Sutton concluded.
NexusOp is the first true “work when you want”, from home jobs EVER! You don’t need all the requirements and extra equipment. You won’t have out of pocket expense,just to make money. Just answer/make calls utilizing the training and materials offered. There is no set schedule, and various types of opportunities. Sale and Customer Service positions available, with great services.
Nowadays, people are going online to find experts at things they themselves may be struglging with. A growing trend is hiring an expert versus hiring a large company to come in and help fix problems. One resource is Catalant, which hires out experts from $15 an hour to $280 an hour. That's one option if you're looking to help others with your knowledge.

Some of the “gotcha” job offers from the past include check-cashing schemes, mystery shopping, medical billing “jobs” that require you to purchase expensive computer software, and craft-making jobs that ask you to pony up the cash for materials before you get started. And let’s not forget about the famous envelope-stuffing scam that was nothing more than a pyramid scheme designed to siphon money from as many people as possible.


How to Get It: Check out K12 (K12.com) and Connections Academy (ConnectionsAcademy.com). Both organizations offer various benefits — including health insurance, retirement savings accounts and paid time off — depending on where you live. As in any job where you work with kids, there will be a background and reference check as well as interviews. You may also need to be licensed to teach in the state where the students reside.
How to Get It: GoFluent.com is an English training company working with 12 of the world's largest corporations. There are also jobs out there for English as a Second Language (ESL) teachers, which are more structured. Visit ISUS (iSpeakUSpeak.com), a placement and training company. While a degree in education or ESL is ideal, you are encouraged to apply if you are enthusiastic and articulate.
Not to mention, reducing or eliminating that grinding daily commute--something 70% of people said would reduce their overall stress levels in the 2017 Super Survey on flexible and remote work. People also think working remotely would reduce interruptions from colleagues (76%), eliminate distractions (76%), and minimize their exposure to office politics (69%). It’s clear that professionals could reap a lot of benefits if they worked from home--but only if they do it well.
To avoid any confusion, I want to make it clear first that virtual assistant work is not always non-phone, but it can be. Virtual assistants tend to do a little bit of everything, just depending on their skills/expertise. So if you are good at various non-phone tasks (social media marketing/moderation, writing, graphic design, research etc.), then you may be able to do work for some of the companies below putting those non-phone skills to work.
But once you’re in your home office—alone, every day—you might start to miss that collegial camaraderie. Since the UPS incident, I’ve reached out more to colleagues via IM and will post cute pics of my new puppy for my colleagues to see on Yammer. And when we’re on deadline, we even (gasp!) talk on the phone. It’s helped tremendously to make the disconnect not feel so severe. It’s a good balance between having peace and quiet when you need it and much-needed interaction with others, too.
Virtual assistants, commonly referred to as VAs, come in all shapes and sizes. Many companies will hire VAs if they are looking for help with online administrative tasks (email, calendar management, data entry, etc), but don’t necessarily want to hire a full time employee just yet. They’re the perfect work from home job for busy people that may need to drop their work at a moments notice, or have very sporadic availability.
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